Zap! You Love Zinfandel! – Kablam! You Love ZAP!

Pow! There’s big news in ZAPland!

Ask yourself, what do Ridge Vineyards, Biale Vineyards, Terra D’Oro Winery, and Starry Night Winery have in common?

Answer? We’re all board members of ZAP!

And YOU may remember ZAP from such events as the  Annual Zinfandel Festival in San Francisco!

And by the way, t’ain’t too late to save the date! The 2013 edition of the annual ZAP festival is now on the books, dig this:

http://www.zinfandel.org/default.asp?n1=26&n2=920&member=

But back to the point:

POW! There’s big news in ZAPland!

The current and continuing board members of ZAP — those legendary Troubadours of Terroir; those Vivacious Varietal Vaqueros; those Zany, Zoned-in, Zestful Zealouts of Zinfandel, are today happily celebrating the announcement of New Board Members!

Here is the “proper” PR-speakese edition of the news:

Zinfandel Advocates & Producers has announced its new Board of Directors for 2012-2013. Continuing as President is Robert Biale of Robert Biale Vineyards (Napa); the Vice President is Mark Vernon of Ridge Vineyards (Bay Area); Secretary is Chris Leamy of Terra d’Oro Winery (Sierra Foothills) and Treasurer is Bruce Walker of Starry Night Winery (At Large).

The Board of Directors consists of ZAP members who represent the diverse Zinfandel growing regions: from July 2012 through June 2013, new members on the Board are Kevin Riley (Proulx Wines, Central Coast), Randle Johnson (Artezin Wines, At Large), Robert Biale (Robert Biale Vineyards, Napa), Jonathan Lachs (Cedarville, Sierra Foothills), Kent Knight (At Large), Joel Peterson (Ravenswood, S. Sonoma), Kent Rosenblum (Rock Wall Wine Company, Greater Bay Area), Bernie Scarinzi (At Large) and Miro Tcholakov (Trentadue, N. Sonoma).

The nine continuing Board members are Erin Cline (Three Wine Company, At Large), Duane Dappen (D-Cubed Cellars, Napa), Tim Holdener (Macchia, Lodi/Central Valley), Chris Leamy (Terra d’Oro, At Large), Rich Parducci, (McNab Ridge, Mendocino & Lake), Pete Seghesio (Seghesio, N. Sonoma), Mark Vernon (Ridge Vineyards, N. Sonoma) and Bruce Walker (Starry Night Winery, At Large).

Mark Vernon, President of Ridge Vineyards (and Vice-President of Zinfandel Advocates & Producers!), is the living embodiment of our great affection for, and belief in, this fantastic grape; the in-action enactment of our committment to the ever-increasing reputation of, and ever-burgeoning love for, these fantastic wines. That’s why he’s on the board.

Why? Because we love Zinfandel!

But wait!

Is this love controversial?

It can be. Lord knows we’ve waded into the “is it serious or not” waters many times before.

I myself took on the question recently (in rather upright and straightforward form, I might add!), in a post entitled “The Seriousness of Zinfandel,” which can be found by clicking here.

I also took on the question in perhaps more idiosyncratically archetypical fashion in another post entitled “Zin Monk,” which can be found by clicking here. It was in this post that I attempted to lay out, to the best of my ability, and in the way I best saw fit, just exactly what the questions are that drive the so-conceived IDENTITY CRISIS of Zinfandel.

Regarding Zinfandel; the question:

Is it — as the low-brow funky, populist sweaty, good-timin’ egalitarian, country mouse side would have it — the people’s grape? Approachable, affable, not puttin’ on airs? Good for a laugh, great to have at a party, a friend to everyone?

Or is it — as the high-brow uptown, austere elitist , uptight classist, city mouse side would have it — a noble grape? Serious, important, elusive, complex? Not for everyone?

The answer, if you read the post, is Thelonious Monk.

For another take on the IDENTITY CRISIS, I recently sat down with David Amadia, our Vice President of Sales & Marketing. He had recently written an essay on the seriousness of Zinfandel, and between his preparatory essay-research on the subject, and the fascinatingly diverse multi-demographic exposures his job affords him (this is a man who travels all over the world, tasting wines in every conceivable environment: from private dining rooms in Hong Kong and multi-thousand-capacity halls in Dusseldorf, to the back room of a wine bar in Reno and a speakeasy in Texas), I figured no one in the world was better-positioned to speak to the IDENTITY CRISIS. So, when asked to address the matter of whether Zinfandel should be considered a “serious” wine or not, he had this to say:



Should you be so inclined, I heartily recommend that you read David’s full essay, entitled “Zinfandel: A Great Wine.” You can find it by clicking the link below:

spring2012

***Attention! Penultimate essay quote:

The percentage of zinfandel that falls into the great category has been growing steadily over the past fifty years, and now compares favorably with percentages of great cabernet and pinot noir produced in California. The time has come for those quaffers of cabernet and pinot to pour themselves a glass of Lytton Springs or Geyserville, and say “That’s great wine!”

All of which is just to say … all of which is just to say … all of which is just to say that, in just writing “All of which is just to say,” I’ve just been reminded of the great William Carlos William poem, “This Is Just To Say!” Which goes like this:

I have eaten

the plums

that were in

the icebox

-

and which

you were probably

saving

for breakfast

-

Forgive me

they were delicious

so sweet

and so cold

which might be paraphrased to serve our purposes here, as follows:

I have tasted

the zinfandels

that were in

the cellar

-

and which

you were probably

saving

for dinner

-

Forgive me

they were delicious

so serious

and so fun

All of which is just to say, Congratulations to the New Board Members of ZAP!



Categories: History, Varietals & Blends, Video, Vineyards and Oenology, Wine & Poetry, Wine Quotes, Wine Tales, Winemaking, Zinfandel

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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